This one’s interesting.

And a bit touchy.

A lot of people seem to have a problem with making money from their artistic endeavors.

They operate under the assumption that getting paid for something automatically makes it less artistic.

This is absolute nonsense.

(And in fact, it might be doing you more harm than good.)

Are Apple’s products less awesome because you paid for them? No.

If you’re doing good work out of your studio, it’ll be good work whether you get paid or not. Why not make a few bucks from it?

In fact, I think you not only CAN but SHOULD charge for your studio services. Because:

People value what they pay for. 

When I pay for something, I’m much more likely to use it and get the most out of it.

If all you offer is “free” recording services, people might assume your services are worth just that…nothing.

“Man, this guy doesn’t even charge. He must be horrible. I think I’ll pass.”

Free can be a great way to get people in the door. But it’s no way to build a business.

And there’s the magic word.

Business.

Even if you’re not “in this for the money,” you should treat your studio work as a business.

There’s something about being paid for your work that makes you step up your game.

And that’s something you just don’t get when you live in Freeville.

Now…if you don’t feel like you have enough experience to warrant charging for your services, I understand.

You need to build up your portfolio as fast as possible.

One great way to do that is to mix a couple albums.

You can do that with my new “Mix Practice” product.

Download the tracks.

Mix away.

Acquire that much-needed experience.

Build that portfolio.

Get started here:

www.HomeStudioCorner.com/practice

Joe Gilder
Home Studio Corner

  • Joe

    What would be a reasonable rate for starters? Should one charge by the hour or per track?

    • That’s a question only you can answer.