It happens far too often.

People try to create big-sounding mixes using mixing tricks.

I’m all for mixing tricks, but I’ve found that the biggest contributor to how big my mix sounds is the production behind it. Specifically, what parts were recorded.

I ran into this issue on my most recent EP, which I released late last year.

I was mixing one of the songs, and the final chorus simply wasn’t hitting hard enough. I tried several mix tricks to make it sound bigger, but they just didn’t work.

Finally, I decided what to do. I grabbed a mic, took 10 minutes, and gave the song exactly what it needed.

It’s a trick that can work in your mixes too. Check it out on my latest video:

  • Wes DeLoach

    Man I miss being a VIP member..good stuff man!

  • staudtgc

    What occurs to me is to add a guitar–distorted high rhythm or leads during the vocal pauses (there are many). Everything else is playing so laid-back-in-the-groove–I think that’s where the energy befitting an emotional last chorus is lacking. Worth a try, if you haven’t already.

  • Chuck Sadosky

    Thanks for the demo Joe. The extra work sounds worth it. Only one comment which I think would/would have helped maybe to cut the rap by a few bars. I think it led the track down a new path just that much too long. Thanks again. Peace B|

  • http://indiemusicworks.com/henry_mittnacht/ Henry

    Awesome!

  • TheRocker

    Yep,,, this definitely gives the added build transition ,,, thanks for sharing 😀
    For me using Studio One, I would think your Events are just graphically larger,,, I highly doubt you recorded that hot, lol,,
    Thought those not using Studio One might think otherwise, lol,,,
    For my vox, to make it sound better, I try to get someone else to sing it other than me, lmao,,,