Here’s a recording of a training session I did for the folks at Presonus.

It’s all about how I set up a mix using both my DAW (Studio One) and a 24-channel digital mixer (Presonus StudioLive 24.4.2). We had a lot of fun. Enjoy!

(The training starts at around minute 5.)

  • Nhỏ Bé Thôi

    I ask you about 4 Sub-Group that you have in Studio One? How you receive signal?

    • You just route the tracks to the busses. You create a bus, name it, then change the output of the tracks to that bus.

  • Nhỏ Bé Thôi

    how to send 2 your bus to studio one? you send it by digital send or you send it by send to input of audio interface?

    • Not sure what you’re asking. Each track in the DAW has an output setting. You set it to what bus you want it to feed into.

  • Bigz

    Awesome video I am new to studio one I am using that same studio live 24.4.2 to do our recording I have a question how do I export all them channels into one file to make them a song like right now we recorded channels 1,2,4,5,6,7,10,11,12,14 how do I export them to make a sound track. Only thing I find when exporting mixdown is it only lets you export each individual channels can’t find out how to make all these channels into a track

    • You’ve gotta route everything to the main output and Export the song.

  • Alex

    Dude, this was a cool video. It really starts to shift the thinking that you can’t do a professional mix outside of Pro Tools.

    • Yeah, the tools aren’t nearly as important as HOW you use them.

  • Johan Leoo

    Really interesting to see. I don’t have a mixer or anything (well technically my interface is a small mixer but I couldn’t use it like that.) I would love to have a control surface one day though, because even though your workflow intrigues me, I really don’t want to set up a whole mix like that and not be able to go back to it later (or can you store all the settings and levels and stuff in the studio live and recall them at a later date?) because you said you’d record the subgroups into those two channels at the top when you’re done right?

    Anyway, I really prefer the moving faders and tweaking knobs over pointing and clicking with a mouse, as you said, just feels more musical somehow. My dad is doing a lot of audio stuff at the church he goes to and I used to do a lot of it with him. I don’t go to church any more, but I kinda grew up sitting at that mixer and learning how it all works by watching, and later by doing it myself, and I kinda miss that sitting in my studio. He is going to need some help during an upcoming conference though so I’m gonna jump i and do some audio work there.

    Anyway, that’s enough ranting. I just hope I’ll be able to make enough money off recording to buy some kind of control surface in the future. Here’s to hoping! And to music 😀

    • The cool thing about the StudioLive is that everything gets saved, so it’s very easy to recall. You just have to manually move the faders back to their spots (but the mixer tells you where to out them).

      • Johan Leoo

        Then that’s pretty cool. It’s really awesome how many ways there are to do any one thing in a studio, and not one of the ways is the wrong way!

      • frugihoyi

        It’s the same for the EQ and other effects I would imagine. I guess those knobs just go around in circles forever and you don’t have to set them again, right?

  • Jonny Lipsham

    Loved it, Joe. It took me back a good few years working through a mixer. The hybrid concept is a fantastic idea, which I find very appealing. If ONLY I had a mixer! The part I found most impressive was where you mixed your BVs ‘deaf’, improvising it. And…..they sounded pretty good!

    Need to save those pennies for a mixer…… 😉

  • Cool insight, Joe. I don’t use a mixer but it is very nice to see how you implemented it into your system 🙂