It’s addicting.

My wife and I are really good at watching TV shows on Netflix that were REALLY popular five years ago.

This time around it’s Fringe.

[Teensy-tiny claim to fame — While I worked in sales at Sweetwater, I actually had an email exchange with J.J. Abrams, the creator of Fringe, Lost, etc. He didn’t buy anything…]

Okay. Fringe. The basic premise is that all these crazy, inexplicable things are happening, things that traditional science can’t explain. So the FBI turns to what they call “fringe science,” the study of weird things. 🙂

Over the course of the show, it becomes evident that there are multiple, parallel universes, co-existing simultaneously.

Somehow they exist at the same time, in the same “space,” but each is completely separated from the other.

DID YOU KNOW…that you can do a very similar thing when mixing?

Okay, okay, you can’t create a completely separate universe for your mixes, but you CAN use a cool technique called parallel processing.

Parallel processing is essentially taking two copies of the same signal, processing each of them differently, then blending the two back together.

You can do it with all sorts of tracks and plugins. Here are a few ways I’ve done it in the past:

  • Drums – Use parallel compression on the drum bus.
  • Bass – Use parallel processing to blend in some distortion.
  • Vocals – Use parallel compression (even EQ) to bring the vocal to the front of the mix.
  • Kick Drum – Use parallel compression and EQ to make one “punch” and the other one “snap”
  • and bunches more…

The thing is…it’s one of those things you have to really see and hear (and try for yourself) to understand how cool it can be.

So…I’m going to do this month’s VIP session on parallel processing. I’ll show you all the different ways I use it, what it sounds like, and why you’d want to use it in a mix.

The session will be live on UStream (on Tuesday, October 30th at 2pm Central Time). It’s free to attend live, but only  VIP members will have access to the recording (along with all the previous NINETEEN VIP session video recordings).

You can get access to all that for the cost of a cup of coffee.

Go jump on board here:

www.HomeStudioCorner.com/VIP

  • Do you use parallel compression on ez-drummer Joe?

    • Depends on the song and what the mix is sounding like. 🙂

  • ChrisPorro

    if you haven’t already mad men IS as good as people say it is.

    some compressors have parallel compression built in. mine (am-munition) allows you to blend the 2 copies.

    for vox, like you said, it can really help solidify them. i pound the ba-jesus out of the vox and then bring that up just enough to make the vox stable. it’s not much and you can’t even hear it that much but it makes a big stability difference. yay.

  • And it’s also a great way to make a mix muddy and cruddy if it’s not done right.

    • Yup. I only do it if one track won’t cut it.