• Walt

    For those of us that don’t have a powerful enough system to monitor the recording through the DAW with zero latency, but rather have to monitor direct through the recording hardware interface, I’m afraid we have to sometimes use the old “move one can off of the ear to hear the room” trick.

    I wonder if delay could be used to distract the musician from noticing the latency? Hmmmm….

    • Quan Chi

      Thats a interesting thought. Good thinking on your part with the using delay to distract the musician from latency. Hope that can work!

    • I think that’s VERY likely. Distract ‘em with even MORE delay. 🙂

  • Rob

    If it were my vocals, I’d sing it dry and add stuff later. I’ve learned to match pitch and volume with my ear, and also to focus on quality as I go. The only effects I would normally sing through before mixing would be distortion or some kind of EQ to make a radio or bullhorn sound, which can be a lot of fun sometimes.

    • Distortion is super fun to sing through

  • Renee_Jacobs

    Does the same concept work with live sound/vocals? For instance, during worship service depending upon the song we’re singing would determine whether it sound better with the delay or reverb.

    • It’s always fun to experiment with delay instead of or even in addition to reverb in a live setting. You’ll have to feel it out. Don’t want it to be distracting, etc.

    • Walt

      Yes, I tend to use some verb coming back in the monitors at the musicians, but only a fraction of what is in the house mix. I’ve had some bothered by having too much in there, but a small amount can bring confidence. I like to talk to each musician to tailor the monitor mix so they feel most comfortable – that’s what matters (except when you have to do something unusual to help them to sing with better pitch:) )

      As to verb or delay in the house mix – like Joe says, you have to feel it out. What works best can vary from one song to the next.

      • Renee_Jacobs

        I definitely appreciate your input. It’s a work in progress but I know we’ll be able to get some incredible sound once we play around with it. Truth is I’m somewhat in the infant stage of it all so hearing the suggestions and comments from veterans like yourselves keeps me motivated. Thank you.

  • John Judge

    To all the folks saying that a delay will throw the singers off, just make sure it is in time with the track….problem solved…

    • It’s definitely not a one-size-fits-all solution. But I think most singers haven’t ever heard it before, and it could be a really energizing thing for them.

  • doug lankford

    I have found in the past that some singers tend to sing off key when using reverb during recording i jave not tried the delay though i my self like to go dry so i stay on pitch. Thinks for the info though i will try the delay trick.

    • That’s definitely a huge possibility. Singers who sing off key during recording typically can’t hear themselves well enough. They’re embarrassed to hear themselves so loud in the their headphone mix, which is ironic because they sound worse when they can’t hear themselves.

  • Trevor Petrie

    I get the concept but as a singer I’d much prefer to hear the reverb in the cans. The delay just sounds like latency to me.

    • Haha. Good point. You could use the delay to hide your latency problems. 😉

      • Trevor Petrie

        Haha, true! “What latency? Oh that’s just a delay effect I like to use” 😉

  • barry williams

    thanks again JOE

  • Gary Husson

    Great advice, Joe. I produce lots of hard rock music and am used to using delay on the guitars and I love it, but I’ve never thought of using it instead of reverb on the vocals. Sounds cool, can’t wait to give it a try.

  • Brian

    A agree in the sense that I almost alway favor a delay on vocals over reverb, especially if all your other instruments are going through a reverb channel.

  • Inge Iden

    Nice. I am using Garageband, and find the overall sound a bit “muddy”. Not as clear as Cubase. Is that just my opinion, or has anyone else the same feeling ? Also, I am thinking about an upgrade to Pro Logic X. Is it really that much better. I use Garageband for home demos only.

    • Quan Chi

      Only reason I would get another DAW is to speed my workflow and have something that personally inspires me more and makes my music production easier for me and myself only but as far as one DAW being better than another for sound quality, that is pure crap. Dont get a new DAW for better sound quality. You will come to find you wont get it. Getting great sound comes from having a great understanding of how to attain a great sound.

      • Inge Iden

        I find that Garageband is a quick way to get ideas and inspiration “on tape”, and Cubase seems a bit harder to set up. As long as I can’t import wave files (EZ drummer) to Garageband I would be looking at Pro Logic.

        • Quan Chi

          I would recommend one of three DAWS. Logic is one of them. The other two are Pro Tools and Presonus Studio One 3 Professional. The one I use is Presonus Studio One 3. Joe also uses this DAW and once I checked out all his free tutorial videos, I instantly fell in love with it’s features. Another well known DAW is Ableton Live. I personally dont like it because it doesn’t look inspiring to me. It just looks so boring. It does have very nice features though. I tryed it for myself but decided not to go with it.

          • Bryan Hoogenboom

            +1 for Studio One. I tried Cubase and found it very difficult to work with. Studio One is very intuitive and Joe’s videos are excellent. It’s got all of the functionality you need.

          • Yung Felluh Cloudgang Cge

            Yes ableton is kinda boring even the wave form doesn’t strike me how sad dynamic range is poor compared to pro tools

            • Quan Chi

              Dynamic range as in volume???

              • Yung Felluh Cloudgang Cge

                Basically yea the diff btwin the loudest n softest parts in ableton is not good n u easily clip in ableton worse if u have no preamp

                • Quan Chi

                  You sure about that? The likelyhood is if there is some type of issue with dynamic range or headroom or whatever have you, it’s in your control regardless of what DAW you use. A good way to tell whether it’s your DAW or yourself causing the issue is asking a professional who uses that DAW. If they do not have the same issues you have, likelyhood is it’s something involving your recording setup or your gain staging.

                  • Yung Felluh Cloudgang Cge

                    That’s a valid point too at the end of the day it’s about the user ain’t it ?however from. Your experience would u care to explain your signal chain incl DAW?

                    • Quan Chi

                      Sure. I have a Schitt Magni 2 Uber as my main headphone amp, a Focusrite 2i2 interface, I’m either using FL Studio or Presonus Studio One Professional 3, I have a 49 key midi keyboard, and my Sennheiser HD600 headphones. I have some other stuff to my setup but those are minor so I wont mention them for the purpose of this message. That’s about it though. Whats your setup and DAW you use?

                    • Quan Chi

                      Oh. I forgot to mention my Sony Vaio laptop. Lol

        • Walt

          I’m still a REAPER fan. I agree that Cubase is cumbersome – never liked it. I’d take the (highly configurable) organization and workflow of REAPER even over ProTools.

          • Quan Chi

            Awesome. I never used REAPER but I would love to try it and find out if it’s worth it. The full version is very very affordable ^_^

            • Walt

              Another cool thing about REAPER is that the demo IS the full version. Paying is on the honor system. As soon as I fell in love with it, that made me want to pay for a license. (About one tenth the cost of Pro-Tools.) I even used the very responsive help forum before paying – made me want to be a part of that group…

              • Quan Chi

                Thanks for sharing that, Walt. Does it work both on Mac and PC???

    • My guess is that if it sounds muddy it’s your recordings, not the software.

  • Dave

    So trading reverb for delay. I’m not sure most singers would notice much of a difference. You might throw them off if they are used to verb playing live to a delay in the studio. Just my opinion.