Video: Record to Disk – An Alternative to Bounce to Disk

In yesterday’s video, I showed the basics of how to bounce to disk. However, I find bounce to disk to be a bit limiting. It’s great if you just need a quick bounce of a session, but if you want more control over your mixes as they are bounced, check out this video.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0iCiy_ZjAI

Video: How to Bounce to Disk

btdOkay, so you’ve got Pro Tools, and you’ve recorded a masterpiece, but how do you get it to a CD or iTunes? That’s where Bounce to Disk comes into play. 

In this video, I explain Bounce to Disk and show you how to do it.

If you’re already familiar with bouncing, be sure to come back for the next video. I’ll show you an alternative to Bounce to Disk that I like to use.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aq9BEmoYbQo

Video: EQ-Learning Trick

1band-eqLearning EQ can be tricky, especially if your starting out. Or perhaps you’ve been recording for quite a while, but you could use a little more ear training when it comes to EQ.

If you’re like me, you may not be as familiar with the frequency spectrum as you’d like to be. Do you know what 100 Hz sounds like? How about 300 Hz? Or 14 kHz?

In this video I’ll show you a little trick I came across a while back when I was trying to gain a better understanding of EQ in general. It turns out what I thought was 100 Hz was more like 60 Hz. What I thought was 1 kHz was more like 500 Hz.

Using this technique, you can hone in on specific frequency ranges and take a listen. What does 400 Hz sounds like in the context of an entire mix? Find out for yourself. It’ll help you make more educated decisions as you mix.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK7i4OK05Z0

Video: Pro Tools Track Types Part 2 – The Master Fader

Yesterday I went through the first four track types in Pro Tools – audio, MIDI, instrument, and aux tracks. Today I want to delve into the mysterious master track, or master fader track.

Metering

In a typical Pro Tools session, you’ve got a bunch of audio tracks, a few instrument/MIDI tracks, and a couple aux tracks. The outputs of all these tracks are typically set to “Analog 1-2,” the main stereo outputs of your interface.

Internally, Pro Tools takes all these individual audio signals and combines them into a single pair of outputs. This is called summing.

When all of these tracks are combined, it’s very easy to clip the mix bus. None of the tracks have to even be close to setting off the clip light, but when they’re all summed together, there’s a good chance that clipping is happening underneath the hood.

How do we monitor this? The answer is the master fader.

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Video: Using an Instrument Track to Build Background Vocals

Background vocals. They can make such a big difference in your music. However, a good background vocal takes some planning, especially if you’re doing a three- or four-part harmony. 

It’s best to figure out the arrangement before you begin recording. Otherwise, you’ll end up recording eight tracks of BGVs, only to decide that you don’t like the note choices. Suddenly you’re back at square one.

In this video I show you how to use an instrument track to build great background vocals. And yes, in this video I’m using Logic! You may have read my article on why I use Pro Tools, but for this video, I dug through the archives for a song I recorded in Logic that showcases this particular technique.

The same concept applies whether your on Pro Tools or anything else. Enjoy!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RAvSmykJMo

Check out my other videos here.