Using Electric Guitar to Cover up Noise/Bleed on an Acoustic Guitar Track [Video]

As home studio owners, you and I will always be searching for better ways to handle noise. We’ll never have a perfectly clean recording with absolutely no noise. It just won’t happen.

However, to me this is just another part of the fun of having a home studio. You’ve got to come up with creative ways to handle specific problems. In this video, I’ll show you how I use an electric guitar to help cover up the noise and headphone bleed that almost ruined an acoustic guitar track. Check it out and let me know what you think by leaving a comment below. Thanks!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rlh-576UKnI

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Intro to Compression [Video]

Last week I posted the video Intro to EQ. This week we’re moving right along into the world of compression.

Compression can be a difficult concept to understand. I know because it took me a long time to get a handle on it. Hopefully this video will help clear some things up.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDhr8vJesNs

What thoughts to you have on compression? Leave a comment.

4 Ways to Use Playlists in Pro Tools [with Video]

Do you use playlists in Pro Tools? Do you know what they are?

Playlists are very cool and can be quite useful. Basically, each track in Pro Tools can have as many playlists as you want. These playlists are basically different “versions” of that track.

1. Recording Takes

The most common use of playlists is keeping track of takes. Let’s say you’re recording a vocal and you want to record several different takes. You have two options, you can create a new audio track for each take, or you can use playlists.

The way it works is by clicking the drop-down menu on the left-hand side of the track in edit window and selecting “New…”

Playlist Menu

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Video: Making Money with Music in a Digital World

I came across this video earlier this week. Big thanks to Home Studio Guru for posting it! I linked to the video on my Twitter account, but it’s so good, I wanted to post it here on the blog as well.

If you’re a home studio owner, a musician, or both, chances are you would like to (at some point) make some money with your music. This video challenges the whole business model of musicians trying to make money from basic album sales.

With digital piracy going on everywhere, what is the musician to do? Give up and give away music for free? While a lot of people are lamenting the downward spiral of album sales, there are others who are taking advantage of digital technology and coming up with creative new ways to make money with their music.

Even if you are strictly a recording engineer, you should watch this. After all, if your clients aren’t able to make money off of the albums you record for them, you’ll run out of clients. Your clients need to be successful for you to be successful.

It’s a longer video (around 30 minutes), and it’s all powerpoint (gag), but the information is really good and quite inspiring. 

Have a wonderful holiday weekend, and enjoy!

NARM 2009 State Of The Industry: Michael Masnick from NARM on Vimeo.

Video: Record to Disk – An Alternative to Bounce to Disk

In yesterday’s video, I showed the basics of how to bounce to disk. However, I find bounce to disk to be a bit limiting. It’s great if you just need a quick bounce of a session, but if you want more control over your mixes as they are bounced, check out this video.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0iCiy_ZjAI

Video: How to Bounce to Disk

btdOkay, so you’ve got Pro Tools, and you’ve recorded a masterpiece, but how do you get it to a CD or iTunes? That’s where Bounce to Disk comes into play. 

In this video, I explain Bounce to Disk and show you how to do it.

If you’re already familiar with bouncing, be sure to come back for the next video. I’ll show you an alternative to Bounce to Disk that I like to use.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aq9BEmoYbQo

Video: EQ-Learning Trick

1band-eqLearning EQ can be tricky, especially if your starting out. Or perhaps you’ve been recording for quite a while, but you could use a little more ear training when it comes to EQ.

If you’re like me, you may not be as familiar with the frequency spectrum as you’d like to be. Do you know what 100 Hz sounds like? How about 300 Hz? Or 14 kHz?

In this video I’ll show you a little trick I came across a while back when I was trying to gain a better understanding of EQ in general. It turns out what I thought was 100 Hz was more like 60 Hz. What I thought was 1 kHz was more like 500 Hz.

Using this technique, you can hone in on specific frequency ranges and take a listen. What does 400 Hz sounds like in the context of an entire mix? Find out for yourself. It’ll help you make more educated decisions as you mix.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK7i4OK05Z0