langejanLast weekend I was recording acoustic guitar for a friend. He was having trouble getting a good recording of his guitar, so he asked me to give it a shot.

It was a beautiful Langejans guitar. I had never heard of the brand, but this was a gorgeous guitar with rosewood back and sides. The guitar had a huge bottom end, but was also surprisingly bright as well. I loved the sound of it.

I decided to stereo-mic the guitar. However, rather than use a spaced pair of microphones – one up by the neck, one down around the bridge – I decided to place the mics closer together.

Then I remembered getting a stereo mic bar months ago. I had actually never used it. After some digging around, I finally found it and put it to work.

What is a stereo mic bar?

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btdOkay, so you’ve got Pro Tools, and you’ve recorded a masterpiece, but how do you get it to a CD or iTunes? That’s where Bounce to Disk comes into play. 

In this video, I explain Bounce to Disk and show you how to do it.

If you’re already familiar with bouncing, be sure to come back for the next video. I’ll show you an alternative to Bounce to Disk that I like to use.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aq9BEmoYbQo

Here are some links from around the web that I’ve come across over the last couple of weeks. I posted them all to my Twitter account, but I thought I’d post them again here in case you missed them. You can follow me on Twitter here – @joegilder.

Enjoy!

Photo by jmarty

Photo by jmarty

Someone asked me the other day how to go about promoting his home studio. He said he knew what gear to get and how to use it all, but wanted to know how to get his name out there and spread the word.

This is a great question. After all, who cares if you have a nice home studio if you don’t have any musicians to record!

In response to his question, I’ve come up with 10 ways to promote your home studio.

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1band-eqLearning EQ can be tricky, especially if your starting out. Or perhaps you’ve been recording for quite a while, but you could use a little more ear training when it comes to EQ.

If you’re like me, you may not be as familiar with the frequency spectrum as you’d like to be. Do you know what 100 Hz sounds like? How about 300 Hz? Or 14 kHz?

In this video I’ll show you a little trick I came across a while back when I was trying to gain a better understanding of EQ in general. It turns out what I thought was 100 Hz was more like 60 Hz. What I thought was 1 kHz was more like 500 Hz.

Using this technique, you can hone in on specific frequency ranges and take a listen. What does 400 Hz sounds like in the context of an entire mix? Find out for yourself. It’ll help you make more educated decisions as you mix.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK7i4OK05Z0

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Photo by lrargerich

Photo by lrargerich

In the recent shoot-out I did between the Shure SM7B and SM58, I discussed some of the reasons why you would use a dynamic microphone for lead vocals as opposed to a condenser.

One of the main reasons is that dynamics tend to pick up less of your room, so if you have a noisy room or just an acoustically bad-sounding room, a dynamic microphone might allow you to still record a decent vocal.

That said, sometimes a condenser microphone simply sounds better.

The next obvious step would be to do everything you can to minimize the amount of room the microphone picks up. The first thing people usually try is to throw the vocalist and microphone into a nearby closet. Problem solved, right? No more room!

Eh…this will usually introduce more problems than solutions. One of the main problems with most home studio rooms is that they are rectangular, chock full of right angles, corners, and parallel surfaces, which cause all sorts of room nodes, standing waves, bass build-up, etc.

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