This week I’ve just got one question. If you have any questions for me, please ask via the Ask Joe form.

Mike wrote:
Was thinking of getting an Apogee Rosetta 200 converter. Do my monitor speakers get connected to the outs on the converter?

xlr-connector

Photo by Y0si

Thanks Mike. This is a great question. First of all, kudos on picking the Rosetta 200. I’m a big fan of Apogee, and I think you’ll love the sound of the Rosetta.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with it, the Apogee Rosetta 200 is a two-channel converter from Apogee. It has two channels of analog-to-digital  converters and two channels of digital-to-analog converters.

The Rosetta is a standalone converter, meaning that it doesn’t have any sort of direct connection to your computer (although they do offer an additional firewire option). In most cases, the Rosetta connects to your audio interface via either a S/PDIF, ADAT, or AES connections.

For example, if I was going to buy a Rosetta 200 for my Pro Tools system, I would connect it to the S/PDIF inputs and outputs on the back of my 003. 

Why buy an external converter?

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langejanLast weekend I was recording acoustic guitar for a friend. He was having trouble getting a good recording of his guitar, so he asked me to give it a shot.

It was a beautiful Langejans guitar. I had never heard of the brand, but this was a gorgeous guitar with rosewood back and sides. The guitar had a huge bottom end, but was also surprisingly bright as well. I loved the sound of it.

I decided to stereo-mic the guitar. However, rather than use a spaced pair of microphones – one up by the neck, one down around the bridge – I decided to place the mics closer together.

Then I remembered getting a stereo mic bar months ago. I had actually never used it. After some digging around, I finally found it and put it to work.

What is a stereo mic bar?

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btdOkay, so you’ve got Pro Tools, and you’ve recorded a masterpiece, but how do you get it to a CD or iTunes? That’s where Bounce to Disk comes into play. 

In this video, I explain Bounce to Disk and show you how to do it.

If you’re already familiar with bouncing, be sure to come back for the next video. I’ll show you an alternative to Bounce to Disk that I like to use.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aq9BEmoYbQo

Here are some links from around the web that I’ve come across over the last couple of weeks. I posted them all to my Twitter account, but I thought I’d post them again here in case you missed them. You can follow me on Twitter here – @joegilder.

Enjoy!

Photo by jmarty

Photo by jmarty

Someone asked me the other day how to go about promoting his home studio. He said he knew what gear to get and how to use it all, but wanted to know how to get his name out there and spread the word.

This is a great question. After all, who cares if you have a nice home studio if you don’t have any musicians to record!

In response to his question, I’ve come up with 10 ways to promote your home studio.

Read more »

1band-eqLearning EQ can be tricky, especially if your starting out. Or perhaps you’ve been recording for quite a while, but you could use a little more ear training when it comes to EQ.

If you’re like me, you may not be as familiar with the frequency spectrum as you’d like to be. Do you know what 100 Hz sounds like? How about 300 Hz? Or 14 kHz?

In this video I’ll show you a little trick I came across a while back when I was trying to gain a better understanding of EQ in general. It turns out what I thought was 100 Hz was more like 60 Hz. What I thought was 1 kHz was more like 500 Hz.

Using this technique, you can hone in on specific frequency ranges and take a listen. What does 400 Hz sounds like in the context of an entire mix? Find out for yourself. It’ll help you make more educated decisions as you mix.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hK7i4OK05Z0

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