Ask Joe #10 – Gear Rentals, Active vs Passive Studio Monitors, & Printing Instruments & Effects

Photo by takomabibelot

Photo by takomabibelot

I had a nice handful of questions this week. Three to be exact. Let’s dive on in.

Question #1

Shawn wrote:

Hi Joe,
I am recording a instrumental jazz/bossa nova piece with classical guitar.  I have a mbox2, AT 4033, MXLV69, AKG C1000S, and a Universal Audio 2610.  Should I rent a mic or a to d conv and go digital in on the mbox.  I have no space and like the acoustics of my bathroom.  What would be the best option for the limited budget.  A U87 is $30 a day.  The rosetta I think 800 is $100 per day.
Thank you so much for your time.
Website: shawnfleming.com

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Sample Rates: Just Marketing Hype?

sample-rateI come across a lot of people who are confused when it comes to sample rates. They see a box that goes up to 192 kHz, and they instinctively think it must be better.

Bigger is better, right? Or is it?

First off, a CD is at a 44.1 kHz sample rate, which means it can reproduce up to around 22.05 kHz. Human hearing caps at 20 kHz, and most of us can’t hear much past 16 kHz anyway. So this should be fine, right?

Well now we have interfaces and converters going all the way up to 192 kHz. These can theoretically capture sounds up to 96 kHz.

Can we hear a difference?

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Ask Joe #7 – Connecting an Apogee Rosetta 200 to Studio Monitors

This week I’ve just got one question. If you have any questions for me, please ask via the Ask Joe form.

Mike wrote:
Was thinking of getting an Apogee Rosetta 200 converter. Do my monitor speakers get connected to the outs on the converter?

xlr-connector

Photo by Y0si

Thanks Mike. This is a great question. First of all, kudos on picking the Rosetta 200. I’m a big fan of Apogee, and I think you’ll love the sound of the Rosetta.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with it, the Apogee Rosetta 200 is a two-channel converter from Apogee. It has two channels of analog-to-digital  converters and two channels of digital-to-analog converters.

The Rosetta is a standalone converter, meaning that it doesn’t have any sort of direct connection to your computer (although they do offer an additional firewire option). In most cases, the Rosetta connects to your audio interface via either a S/PDIF, ADAT, or AES connections.

For example, if I was going to buy a Rosetta 200 for my Pro Tools system, I would connect it to the S/PDIF inputs and outputs on the back of my 003. 

Why buy an external converter?

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