Ask Joe #44 – Big Studio vs Small Studio [Podcast]

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If you have questions, you can ask them here: www.askjoegilder.com

Questions covered this week:

  • When I compare my music to what I hear on the radio, the music on the radio sounds better. What do the big studios have that I don’t have?
  • What interesting effects do you use on vocals?
  • How do I record my guitar and the direct signal at the same time?
  • How do I deal with loud S’s in my vocals?
  • How do I compress the vocals to keep them at a consistent volume?

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For Pete’s Sake…

I’m leaving town tonight.

Saturday night I’m playing a show in South Carolina. It’s apparently going to be a pretty big outdoor event. I’ll be rocking my new Les Paul all night and doing some singing. Very excited.

As you may know, I’m mainly an acoustic guitar player and vocalist. I’ve been playing acoustic guitar much longer than I’ve played electric guitar, but the last several years I’ve really fallen in love with electric.

That said, when I’m playing on stage with an acoustic, I’m super comfortable. Not as much with electric. It’s not that I’m UNcomfortable…it’s just that I’ve played so many more shows with acoustic guitar that it’s like second nature.

Electric makes me think more. (more…)

A Crucial Conversation About Gear

I was having a conversation with my buddy Pete Woj the other day.

Pete’s a cool guy. For one thing, he’s bought just about every tutorial video I’ve ever released (which makes him very popular around HSC headquarters), but he’s also big on APPLYING what he learns.

Anyway, we were talking about recording equipment. He was debating buying a new audio interface and wanted my opinion.

But then he listened to one of my recent podcasts and answered his own question. (more…)

3 Ways to Find Your Focus in a Mix

A buddy of mine went to culinary school.

He was telling me the other day how much the stuff I talk about on Home Studio Corner is so relatable to cooking food.

(Have you ever watched that show “Chopped”? Wow. Super addicting.)

Anyway.

When you’re starting a mix of a song, it can be difficult to know where to start, what to focus on. So you might randomly tweak the drums, then guitars, then bass, then vocals, then back to drums…entering a vicious cycle of tweaking and re-tweaking.

How about this instead?

Think of your mix as a nice, dinner. There are TONS of elements that go into cooking a nice dinner, but a good chef knows how to cook dishes that complement one another, how to combine ingredients in a way that enhances the overall flavor. (more…)

3 Examples of Getting More By Doing Less

Recording is a fickle process.

You want a big, huge, life-changing recording, but you end up with something that sounds more messy than it does big.

How can that be?

If I add more to this song, it should get bigger and fuller, right?

Sometimes that works…sometimes.

But oftentimes we’re just adding and adding without really asking the question “Am I making this better?” (more…)